9:00 am on Sundays in Classroom 11


James Tissot (French, 1836-1902). Meal of Our Lord and the Apostles (Repas de Notre-Seigneur et des apôtres), 1886-1894. Opaque watercolor over graphite on gray wove paper, Image: 5 15/16 x 9 5/16 in. (15.1 x 23.7 cm). SOURCE:  Brooklyn Museum,  00.159.346

James Tissot (French, 1836-1902). Meal of Our Lord and the Apostles (Repas de Notre-Seigneur et des apôtres), 1886-1894. Opaque watercolor over graphite on gray wove paper, Image: 5 15/16 x 9 5/16 in. (15.1 x 23.7 cm). SOURCE:  Brooklyn Museum,  00.159.346

About the group

The group meets on Sunday mornings at 9 am in classroom #11, except during the Summer. Led by CTK members, and Diakonia graduates, Phil Whitley and Scott Simmons, the group explores what it means to be a Lutheran Christian today and many of the challenges and paradoxes of following the way of Jesus in contempoary life. Although the sessions are guided by a book or other text, this is a highly participatory group.

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Current Program: Falling Upward

Throughout the Fall, we are reading and discussing  Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life, by Richard Rohr. From the summary at Amazon:

In Falling Upward, Fr. Richard Rohr seeks to help readers understand the tasks of the two halves of life and to show them that those who have fallen, failed, or "gone down" are the only ones who understand "up." Most of us tend to think of the second half of life as largely about getting old, dealing with health issues, and letting go of life, but the whole thesis of this book is exactly the opposite. What looks like falling down can largely be experienced as "falling upward." In fact, it is not a loss but somehow actually a gain, as we have all seen with elders who have come to their fullness... This important book explores the counterintuitive message that we grow spiritually much more by doing wrong than by doing right--a fresh way of thinking about spirituality that grows throughout life.